How are you feeling during COVID-19? New survey aims to find answers from around the world

More than 200 researchers have joined forces to develop a survey to understand the global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our psychological wellbeing.

With humble beginnings as a Facebook post from Aarhus University’s Andreas Lieberoth and his Colombia University colleague , the survey has since gone around the world, attracting over 149,000 responses.

In Australia, the University of Melbourne’s Dr Benjamin Tag joined the collaboration back in March, translating the questions into English, German and Japanese, distributing the survey widely, developing hypotheses and analysing data.

Woman's hands using laptop with glasses, pen and notebook in foreground
Researchers are attempting to understand the global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our psychological wellbeing

Since Australia’s response to COVID-19 is so far proving effective at slowing the rate of infection, it is important to collect local data to compare to other countries with differing trends.

Painting a holistic picture of COVID-19 impact

Investigating many aspects of everyday life, from the impact of a lingering health crisis on personal wellbeing and behaviour, to changes in the trust towards governments and media, this survey contributes by offering findings to questions of national and international interest.

“We are seeing evidence that the pandemic has serious human consequences - not just for those who are ill, but for everyone’s everyday lives,” explains Lieberoth.

We are seeing evidence that the pandemic has serious human consequences - not just for those who are ill, but for everyone’s everyday lives

The Essential Research survey from the Guardian suggests public trust in both government and media has significantly increased in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results gathered in the COVIDiSTRESS global survey  will allow researchers to examine shifts experienced at a national level in Australia, contextualising them within a global framework.

All data will be made available online, through the Open Science Framework; freely available to researchers, journalists, and politicians to encourage greater use of information.

Currently available in 48 languages, the survey takes roughly 23 minutes to complete. And, as Lieberoth notes, “even if you can only fill out half of the survey, that’s also great. Any kind of participation is a huge help  .”

Want to tell the researchers how you’re feeling? Fill out the survey today.

For further information on this project contact Dr Benjamin Tag.